Commit 9c9914c5 authored by Christophe Palmann's avatar Christophe Palmann
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DOC: enhancement of MVD3 doc

parent 9a5550c9
CookBook/Art/MonteverdiImages/gui.png

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CookBook/Art/MonteverdiImages/gui.png
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......@@ -151,7 +151,14 @@ In the layer stack part:
The dock on the right side is divided into four tabs :
\begin{itemize}
\item Quicklook : gives the user a degraded view of the whole extent, letting him/her easily select the area to be displayed
\item Histogram : gives the user information about the value distribution of the selected channels. By clicking the mouse's left button, user can sample their values.
\item Histogram : gives the user information about the values distribution of the selected channels. By clicking the mouse's left button, user can sample their values.
In particular, in the figure ~\ref{fig:quickhisto}, we have:
\begin{itemize}
\item 1 : the x position pointed by the mouse
\item 2 and 3 : the extrema values of the bin where x falls
\item 4 : the value of the histogram at position x
\end{itemize}
The same values are displayed for each band.
\item Color Setup : lets the user map the image channels to the RGB channels. Also lets him/her set the alpha parameter (translucency).
\item Color dynamics : lets the user change the displaying dynamics of a selected image. For each RGB channel (each mapped to an image channel), the user can decide how the pixel range of a selected image will be shortcut before being rescaled to 0-255 : either by setting the extremal values, or by setting the extremal quantiles.
\end{itemize}
......@@ -362,6 +369,45 @@ The pansharpened image is placed to the top of the stack layer, and different la
\label{fig:ps5}
\end{figure}
\subsection{Hints}\label{ssec:monhints}
Let's finally give some hints about:
\begin{itemize}
\item projection mechanisms
\item layer effects
\item navigation performance
\end{itemize}
The projection mechanisms are quite important if having to display several images at the same time.
Indeed, each time an image is loaded, \mont can detect if an EPSG code is available for this image (EPSG stands for European Petroleum Survey Group).
Each EPSG code simply maps to a spatial reference system (SRS) and can be used to identify the SRC of an image.
So, if such an SRC is identified, it will be used to display an image at the correct position. As mentionned previously, if several images have different SRC,
then the user can select the one to be used as reference, by simply using the wigdet provided for that purpose (see top toolbar subsection) : all images will be then projected regarding the reference SRC.
If no SRC can be found when loading an image, then \mont will try to find a sensor model; if there is one, \mont will apply the correct tranformations so that this image still can be placed at the right position.
Finally, if no SRC or sensor model can be found for a given image, then its projection status will be set to Unknown; the pixels will be located by using the origin and the spacing of the image:
\begin{verbatim}
Loc_X = origin+spacing_X*i
Loc_Y = origin+spacing_Y*j
\end{verbatim}
If users try to load such images with images having a known projection at the same time, they will be warned by \mont.
If users agree to continue, then \mont will use no projection at all, and the previous convention (using origin and spacing information) will be used instead.
Concerning the layer effects, it was observed that they can be quite useful according to the tasks to be achieved.
This kind of functionalities relies on the concept of shaders. In the fields of computer graphics, shaders calculate rendering effects on graphics hardware with a high degree of flexibility.
They describe the traits of either a vertex (position, texture coordinates, colors...) or a pixel (color, z-depth, alpha value), and thus can produce the right levels of color within an image.
In the case of \mont, they are used to produce the layer effects mentioned in the previous sections.
Note that they are not implemented within \mont directly, but within ICE-viewer, a light and powerfull tool developped by the CNES, and used to visualize remote sensing images.
ICE-viewer is thus a dependency of \mont, and must be compiled and installed beforehand.
A last word about navigation performance. When zooming out/in or dragging an image,
the displaying of the result is not exactly performed from the image itself, but :
\begin{itemize}
\item from subparts of the image, ie. tiles.
\item from a multiresolution pyramid computed from the loaded tiles.
\end{itemize}
This mechanism allows a gain of performance which makes the experience of the user more pleasant.
The user can change the settings of this mechanism from the Main menu, Edit, Preferences.
\subsection{Conclusion}\label{ssec:moncon}
The images used in this documentation can be found in the OTB-Data repository (https://git.orfeo-toolbox.org/otb-data.git):
......
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