Commit 22671f44 authored by Daniel McInerney's avatar Daniel McInerney

DOC: dmci edits to cookbook and basic filters examples

parent 9501aa16
......@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ Other packages
Warning! These packages may not be up-to-date with latest OTB
releases. In addition, some features of the library may not be available
on every platform. Some of these are not maintained by OTB-team. If you
on every platform. Some of these are not maintained by the OTB-team. If you
want to get involved in the packaging of OTB for your favourite
platform, please contact us through the developer’s mailing list:
otb-developers@googlegroups.com.
......@@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ You will then need to run:
sudo aptitude install otb-bin otb-bin-qt python-otb
If you are using *Synaptic*, you can add the repositories, update and
install the packages through the graphical interface.
install the packages through the graphical user interface.
For further information about Ubuntu packages go to
`ubuntugis-unstable <https://launchpad.net/~ubuntugis/+archive/ubuntugis-unstable>`__
......
......@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@ necessary to install one of the following packages:
Python bindings
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Starting from OTB 5.8.0, OTB bindings for Python 2.7 are distributed with binary
Starting from OTB 5.8.0, OTB bindings for Python 2.7 are distributed as a binary
package. With OTB 6.4.0, additional bindings for Python 3.5 are also included.
Please note that using a different Python version may not be compatible with
OTB wrappings. If no compatible Python 2.x version is found a
......
......@@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ supplied script ``tools/uninstall_otb.sh``.
Python bindings
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Starting from OTB 5.8.0, OTB bindings for Python 2.7 are distributed with binary
Starting from OTB 5.8.0, OTB bindings for Python 2.7 are distributed as a binary
package. With OTB 6.4.0, additional bindings for Python 3.5 are also included.
Please note that using a different Python version may not be compatible with
OTB wrappings. If no compatible Python 2.x version is found a
......
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ start Visual Studio.
Python bindings
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Starting from OTB 5.8.0, OTB bindings for Python 2.7 are distributed with binary
Starting from OTB 5.8.0, OTB bindings for Python 2.7 are distributed as a binary
package. With OTB 6.4.0, additional bindings for Python 3.5 are also included.
Please note that using a different Python version may not be compatible with
OTB wrappings. If no compatible Python 2.x version is found a
......
......@@ -40,9 +40,9 @@ command-line interface of the Convert application, while
Command-line launcher
---------------------
The command-line application launcher allows to load an application
The command-line application launcher loads an application
plugin, to set its parameters, and execute it using the command line.
Launching the ``otbApplicationLauncherCommandLine`` without argument
Launching the ``otbApplicationLauncherCommandLine`` without any arguments provided,
results in the following help to be displayed:
::
......@@ -200,7 +200,7 @@ modules needs to be properly set with the ``OTB_APPLICATION_PATH``
environment variable. The standard location on Unix systems is
``/usr/lib/otb/applications``. On Windows, the applications are
available in the ``otb-bin`` OSGeo4W package, and the environment is
configured automatically so you don’t need to tweak
configured automatically so it doesn't need to be modified
``OTB_APPLICATION_PATH``.
Once your environment is set, you can use OTB applications from Python, just
......@@ -233,7 +233,7 @@ The processing toolbox
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
OTB applications are available from QGIS. Use them from the processing
toolbox, which is accessible with Processing :math:`\rightarrow`
toolbox, which is accessible under Processing :math:`\rightarrow`
ToolBox. Switch to “advanced interface” in the bottom of the application
widget and OTB applications will be there.
......@@ -243,7 +243,7 @@ Using a custom OTB
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
If QGIS cannot find OTB, the “applications folder” and “binaries folder”
can be set from the settings in the Processing :math:`\rightarrow`
can be set from the settings found under Processing :math:`\rightarrow`
Settings :math:`\rightarrow` “service provider”.
.. figure:: Art/QtImages/qgis-otb-settings.png
......@@ -278,7 +278,7 @@ parameter:
otbcli_BandMath -inxml saved_applications_parameters.xml
Note that you can also overload parameters from command line at the same
Note that you can also add additional parameters on the command line at the same
time
::
......@@ -355,7 +355,7 @@ Here is an example of MPI call on a cluster::
One can see that the registration and pan-sharpening of the
panchromatic and multi-spectral bands of a Pleiades image has been split
among 560 cpus and took only 56 seconds.
among 560 cpus and only took 56 seconds.
Note that this MPI parallel invocation of applications is only
available for command-line calls to OTB applications, and only for
......
......@@ -50,8 +50,8 @@ prefix.
// All variables related to anotherImage (input 2) will have the prefix im3
filter->SetNthInput(2, anotherImage);
In this document, we will keep the default convention. Following list
summaries the available variables for input #0 (and so on for every
In this document, we will keep the default convention. The following list
summarises the available variables for input #0 (and so on for every
input).
Variables and their descriptions:
......@@ -80,7 +80,7 @@ Variables and their descriptions:
[variables]
Moreover, we also have the generic variables idxX and idxY that
In addition, we also have the generic variables idxX and idxY that
represent the indices of the current pixel (scalars).
Note that the use of a global statistics will automatically make the
......@@ -149,7 +149,7 @@ two vectors (see next section “New operators and functions”
Now, let’s go back to the first formula: this one specifies the addition
of two images band to band. With muParserX lib, we can now define such
operation with only one formula, instead of many formulas (as many as
operation with only one formula, instead of many formulae (as many as
the number of bands). We call this new functionality the **batch mode**,
which directly arises from the introduction of vectors within muParserX
framework.
......@@ -178,7 +178,7 @@ For instance, im1b3N3x5 represents the following neighbourhood:
Fundamentally, a neighbourhood is represented as a matrix inside the
muParserX framework; so the remark about mathematically well-defined
formulas still stands.
formulae still stands.
New operators and functions
---------------------------
......@@ -256,22 +256,22 @@ needed; one mean value is computed per input). For instance:
.. math:: mean(im1b1N3x3,im1b2N3x3,im1b3N3x3,im1b4N3x3)
Note: a limitation coming from muparserX itself makes impossible to pass
Note: a limitation coming from muparserX itself makes it impossible to pass
all those neighborhoods with a unique variable.
**Function var** This function allows to compute the variance of a given
**Function var** This function computes the variance of a given
vector or neighborhood (the function can take as many inputs as needed;
one var value is computed per input). For instance:
.. math:: var(im1b1N3x3)
**Function median** This function allows to compute the median value of
**Function median** This function computes the median value of
a given vector or neighborhood (the function can take as many inputs as
needed; one median value is computed per input). For instance:
.. math:: median(im1b1N3x3)
**Function corr** This function allows to compute the correlation
**Function corr** This function computes the correlation
between two vectors or matrices of the same dimensions (the function
takes two inputs). For instance:
......
......@@ -208,7 +208,7 @@ parameters:
-``-out`` the output filtered image
The application can be used like this:
The application can be used as follows:
::
......@@ -253,7 +253,7 @@ input parameters:
-``-out`` the output filtered image
The application can be used like this:
The application can be used as follows:
::
......
......@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@
// The built in functions and operators list is available at:
// \url{http://muparser.sourceforge.net/mup_features.html}.
//
// In order to use this filter, at least one input image is to be
// In order to use this filter, at least one input image should be
// set. An associated variable name can be specified or not by using
// the corresponding SetNthInput method. For the nth input image, if
// no associated variable name has been specified, a default variable
......@@ -57,10 +57,10 @@
// Software Guide : BeginLatex
//
// We start by including the needed header file.
// We start by including the required header file.
// The aim of this example is to compute the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)
// from a multispecral image and perform a threshold on this
// indice to extract area containing a dense vegetation canopy.
// from a multispectral image and then apply a threshold to this
// index to extract areas containing a dense vegetation canopy.
//
// Software Guide : EndLatex
......@@ -82,8 +82,8 @@ int main( int argc, char* argv[])
//
// We start by the classical \code{typedef}s needed for reading and
// writing the images. The \doxygen{otb}{BandMathImageFilter} class
// works with \doxygen{otb}{Image} as input so we need to define additional
// filters to extract each layer of the multispectral image
// works with \doxygen{otb}{Image} as input, so we need to define additional
// filters to extract each layer of the multispectral image.
//
// Software Guide : EndLatex
......@@ -130,9 +130,9 @@ int main( int argc, char* argv[])
// Software Guide : BeginLatex
//
// We need now to extract now each band from the input \doxygen{otb}{VectorImage},
// We now need to extract each band from the input \doxygen{otb}{VectorImage},
// it illustrates the use of the \doxygen{otb}{VectorImageToImageList}.
// Each extracted layer are inputs of the \doxygen{otb}{BandMathImageFilter}:
// Each extracted layer is an input to the \doxygen{otb}{BandMathImageFilter}:
//
// Software Guide : EndLatex
......@@ -183,22 +183,22 @@ int main( int argc, char* argv[])
// Software Guide : BeginLatex
//
// The muParser library offers also the possibility to extended existing built-in functions. For example,
// you can use the OTB expression "ndvi(b3, b4)" with the filter. The mathematical expression would be in
// this case \textit{if($ndvi(b3, b4)>0.4$, 255, 0)}. It will return the same result.
// The muParser library also provides the possibility to extend existing built-in functions. For example,
// you can use the OTB expression "ndvi(b3, b4)" with the filter. In this instance, the mathematical expression would be
// \textit{if($ndvi(b3, b4)>0.4$, 255, 0)}, which would return the same result.
//
// Software Guide : EndLatex
// Software Guide : BeginLatex
//
// Figure~\ref{fig:BandMathImageFilter} shows the result of the threshold over the NDVI indice
// to a Quickbird image.
// Figure~\ref{fig:BandMathImageFilter} shows the result of the threshold applied to the NDVI index
// of a Quickbird image.
// \begin{figure}
// \center
// \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{qb_ExtractRoad_pretty.eps}
// \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{qb_BandMath-pretty.eps}
// \itkcaption[Band Math]{From left to right:
// Original image, thresholded NDVI indice.}
// Original image, thresholded NDVI index.}
// \label{fig:BandMathImageFilter}
// \end{figure}
//
......
......@@ -37,12 +37,12 @@
// Software Guide : BeginLatex
//
// In some situation, it is desirable to represent a gray level image in color for easier
// In some situation, it is desirable to represent a gray scale image in color for easier
// interpretation. This is particularly the case if pixel values in the image are used
// to represent some data such as elevation, deformation map,
// interferogram. In this case, it is important to ensure that similar
// values will get similar colors. You can notice how this requirement
// differ from the previous case.
// differs from the previous case.
//
// The following example illustrates the use of the \doxygen{otb}{DEMToImageGenerator} class
// combined with the \doxygen{otb}{ScalarToRainbowRGBPixelFunctor}. You can refer to the
......@@ -112,7 +112,7 @@ int main(int argc, char * argv[])
// Software Guide : BeginLatex
//
// As in the previous example the \doxygen{itk}{ScalarToRGBColormapImageFilter} is
// As in the previous example, the \doxygen{itk}{ScalarToRGBColormapImageFilter} is
// the filter in charge of calling the functor we specify to do the work for
// each pixel. Here it is the \doxygen{otb}{ScalarToRainbowRGBPixelFunctor}.
//
......@@ -189,8 +189,8 @@ int main(int argc, char * argv[])
// Software Guide : BeginLatex
//
// Figure~\ref{fig:RAINBOW_FILTER} shows effect of applying the filter to
// a gray level image.
// Figure~\ref{fig:RAINBOW_FILTER} shows the effect of applying the filter to
// a gray scale image.
//
// \begin{figure}
// \center
......@@ -199,7 +199,7 @@ int main(int argc, char * argv[])
// \includegraphics[width=0.44\textwidth]{DEMToHotImageGenerator.eps}
// \includegraphics[width=0.44\textwidth]{DEMToReliefImageGenerator.eps}
// \itkcaption[Grayscale to color]{The gray level DEM extracted from SRTM
// data (top-left) and the same area in color representation.}
// data (top-left) and the same area represented in color.}
// \label{fig:RAINBOW_FILTER}
// \end{figure}
// Software Guide : EndLatex
......
......@@ -31,8 +31,8 @@
// lighting source and generating the corresponding shadows. This principle is called
// hill shading.
//
// Using a simple functor \doxygen{otb}{HillShadingFunctor} and the dem image generated
// using the \doxygen{otb}{DEMToImageGenerator} (refer to \ref{sec:ReadDEM}) you can easily
// Using a simple functor \doxygen{otb}{HillShadingFunctor} and the DEM image generated
// using the \doxygen{otb}{DEMToImageGenerator} (refer to \ref{sec:ReadDEM}), you can easily
// obtain a representation of the DEM. Better yet, using the
// \doxygen{otb}{ScalarToRainbowRGBPixelFunctor}, combined with the
// \doxygen{otb}{ReliefColormapFunctor} you can easily generate the classic elevation maps.
......@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@ int main(int argc, char * argv[])
}
// Software Guide : BeginLatex
//
// After generating the dem image as in the DEMToImageGenerator example, you can declare
// After generating the DEM image as in the DEMToImageGenerator example, you can declare
// the hill shading mechanism. The hill shading is implemented as a functor doing some
// operations in its neighborhood. A convenient filter called \doxygen{otb}{HillShadingFilter}
// is defined around this mechanism.
......
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